Celebrating Men's Health Month: Encouraging boys, men and their families to practice and implement healthy living decisions

Celebrating Men's Health Month: Encouraging boys, men and their families to practice and implement healthy living decisions

Introduction

We’re excited to be sharing about Men’s Health Month this June. You see, men are often times not as likely as women to visit a healthcare provider regularly, yet they have a higher risk for certain diseases and chronic health conditions. In fact, the leading causes of death in men are heart disease, cancer and unintentional injury.

Men's Health Month was started in 1994 by Congress.

Men's Health Month was started in 1994 by Congress. This year's theme is "Men: Engage, Connect, Take Action", encouraging boys, men and their families to practice and implement healthy living decisions.

The month-long campaign has been dedicated to raising awareness of men's health issues like prostate cancer, heart disease and suicide prevention since 1993. The founders wanted a month dedicated to encouraging men to take care of themselves because they felt that women were getting all the attention during Women’s Health Awareness Month.

The month of June is dedicated to the health and well-being of the male population.

In the United States, men are more likely to die from prostate cancer and heart disease than women. That's why June is dedicated to the health and well-being of the male population. Men's health is a serious issue that needs to be addressed. Men's health is an important issue that needs improvement in order to increase life expectancy or quality of life among menfolk.

Men’s health is an important issue because it affects not only you, but also your family members as well as friends and colleagues who support you during difficult times when going through a major illness or recovery process after an accident or injury occurs due to poor judgment on your part during extreme emotional stress situations where alcohol consumption may have occurred prior before driving home after work

According to a report from the U.S. Department of Health, life expectancy for males is 76 years old, compared to 81 years old for females.

According to a report from the U.S. Department of Health, life expectancy for males is 76 years old, compared to 81 years old for females. This means that on average, men live about five years less than women do. This gap grows even wider in some countries around the world: In Japan, for example, life expectancy is 83 years old for women and 79 years old for men; it's 80 years old versus 73 years old in France; or 78 versus 72 in Germany.

While this may seem like an anomaly at first glance—after all, aren't men supposed to be healthier?—it turns out that worldwide trends show male mortality rates are higher than female ones almost regardless of where you look or what country you're talking about (with a few exceptions). One leading explanation is differences in lifestyle factors between genders: Men tend not only live longer but also have more opportunities available to them as they age than women do because they are typically better paid throughout their careers; they don't face many obstacles when it comes time deciding whether or not return home after spending some time away from work due medical reasons; and they often have greater access health care services during their lifetimes thanks partly due heavy investments made early stages childhood education programs focusing primarily female children instead boys."

The leading causes of death in men are heart disease, cancer and unintentional injury.

Most men are likely to die from heart disease, cancer and unintentional injury. These three illnesses account for almost two-thirds of all deaths among men aged 35 to 64 years.

Other leading causes of death include suicide, diabetes and liver disease.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), men are less likely than women to visit a healthcare provider even though they face higher risk for certain diseases.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), men are less likely than women to visit a healthcare provider even though they face higher risk for certain diseases. On average, men are more likely to die from cancer, heart disease and suicide than women; they also experience disproportionately high rates of liver disease. Men who do not go see their doctors may be missing signs of health issues that could be addressed earlier with early intervention or treatment.

This is alarming because many cancers are diagnosed at later stages in males than females due to lack of awareness about symptoms that may indicate possible disease. According to a recent study conducted by researchers at Yale University School of Medicine, 80 percent of lung cancer cases occur among never smokers; however, only half (50%) reported being aware they had never smoked before being diagnosed with lung cancer! This means that 40% did not know they were at risk simply because they did not know there was anything else besides cigarettes that could cause lung cancer – something most people understand at some level but which remains elusive for some smokers until it’s too late.

Men have a higher rate of obesity and high blood pressure than women do.

Men are more likely to be overweight than women. In fact, in 2016, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) found that 33 percent of men were obese compared with 25 percent of women. Men also have a higher rate of high blood pressure than their female counterparts. According to the CDC’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 21 percent of men had high blood pressure compared with 16 percent of women in 2015-16. Additionally, more men die from heart disease than women. Based on data from 2013-15 that was presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions 2017, there were about 900 deaths per 100,000 people every year due to coronary artery disease among males between ages 45 and 65—compared with just over 600 deaths per 100,000 people among females in similar age groups during those years."

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting 1 in 6 men and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men.

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting 1 in 6 men, and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. The good news is that prostate cancer can be successfully treated if it's found early.

Prostate cancer can develop slowly over many years and may not cause symptoms until it’s too late to prevent or cure it without treatment. Men with prostate cancer have a higher risk for other health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes, and bladder issues.

If you are between 40-50 years old please talk to your doctor about getting tested for prostate cancer with this simple blood test called PSA (prostate specific antigen). If you're 50 or older and African American then ask your doctor about taking an additional screening test called DRE (digital rectal exam).

Men are more likely than women to abuse alcohol and drugs as well as smoke cigarettes.

Men who smoke are more likely to have heart disease, prostate cancer and lung cancer. Men who drink alcohol are more likely to have high blood pressure and liver disease.

Men are also more likely than women to abuse alcohol or drugs, which can lead to problems such as violence and accidents.

Men need a day to focus on their health every day, not just during Men's Health Month (or week).

Men’s Health Month is the perfect time to get guys to focus on their health. But it shouldn't be a once-a-year event, because men need to focus on their health every day.

Men's Health Month is an opportunity for all of us—men and women alike—to challenge ourselves to make changes in our lives that will help us live longer, healthier lives with more quality time with family and friends.

Conclusion

Men's Health Month is important because it brings awareness to the importance of men's health and encourages all boys, men and their families to make their health a priority. 

Make sure to check out the American Association for Men in Nursing in The Hub of our Lumify app and use "LUM50" for $50 off! 


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